November Fall Festival

November One-Day Street Fair, Downtown Encinitas, Arts, Crafts, Music and a Jump on Holiday Shopping.

Premier Holiday Shopping & Local Entertainment

23rd Annual Encinitas Fall Festival

Sunday, November 24th, 2013 / 9am-4pm

Fall FestivalEVERY NOVEMBER, for two decades, the  Encinitas  101 MainStreet Association has played host to a premier street fair – The Encinitas Fall Festival.  This festival is a ready-made bazaar for holiday shoppers and weekend fun seekers. This year, fair-goers will enjoy a day where coastal breezes meet people gathering to shop, eat, be entertained and enjoy the community’s historical district.

The festival features over 450 vendor booths showcasing various arts, crafts, gifts, food and more. The 200 shops and 40 restaurants and eateries along the Coast Highway from D to J Streets will be open and ready for business. Live music will be playing at two venues: The Lumberyard Courtyard Stage, located at The Lumberyard, and the Community Stage, close to F Street. Both stages will feature the best in local entertainment.

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2013 Premier Holiday Shopping and Entertainment Street Fair

23rd Annual Fall Festival

Sunday, November 24, 2013
9:00am – 4:00pm
Premier Holiday Shopping and Entertainment Tradition

With 450+ booths to visit, plus dozens of unique downtown Encinitas retailers, here’s a perfect opportunity for your holiday shopping.  Enjoy music and dance performances at two stages, as well as three new additions: the Kids Zone, Dog Park and Bike Valet.  Many thanks to our Presenting Sponsor, Tri-City Medical Center.

Kids Zone: North County Health Services presents our first Fall Festival Kids Zone in The Lumberyard at I St.  Children of all ages will enjoy a wide range of interactive booths and activities, including a giant slide and a skate park.

Dog Park: Thanks to Hill’s Ideal Balance, here’s where your canine companions can take a break from the bustling festival.  Our dog park in The Lumberyard at I St. will have over 1300 square feet of turf and an agility course provided by Zoom Room.

Bike Valet: Cyclists can leave their bike at either end of the festival, at D St. or J St., thanks to this free valet service provided by BikeWalkEncinitas.

Lumberyard Courtyard Stage Sponsored by Yelp
The Weis Guys Jazztet (11am)  ~  The Bayou Brothers (1pm)

Community Stage Sponsored by Uber
Ecke Dance Expressions (11am)  ~  Prodigy (11:30am)   ~  Dance Connection (12pm)   ~  California Music Studios (12:30pm)  ~  Janice Lee School of Ballet (1pm)   ~  Church’s Martial Arts (1:30pm)   ~   All Star Dance Company (2pm)   ~   La Costa Canyon Band (2:30pm)   ~   Zumba & Latin Dance (3pm)   ~   Kehulili O Kailani (3:30pm)

Getting There: The Coaster and NCTD buses all stop right in downtown Encinitas, just 1/2 block from the festival. View schedules online. We’re teaming up with Uber so you can ride with ease to and from the event! To get $20 off your first Uber ride, sign up online, or download the app, and enter the promo code FALLFESTIVAL. Questions? Contact supportSD@uber.com.

Parking: Coast Highway 101 will be closed from D Street to J Street starting at 4:00 a.m.  There’s parking in several lots on Vulcan between D and F Streets, including City Hall and the Coaster/NCTD stations, and at Moonlight Beach.

 

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Vendors who wish to participate can find an application at www.kennedyfaires.com

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Premier Holiday Shopping and Entertainment Tradition

Fall Festival

Sunday, November 18th, 2012
EVERY NOVEMBER, for two decades, the Downtown Encinitas MainStreet Association has played host to a premier street fair – The Fall Festival. This festival, previously known as the Poinsettia Festival, is a ready-made bazaar for holiday shoppers and weekend fun seekers. This year, on Sunday, November 18, from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., fair-goers will enjoy a day where coastal breezes meet people gathering to shop, eat, be entertained and enjoy the community’s Historical district. The festival will feature over 450 vendor booths showcasing various arts, crafts, gifts, food and more. The 200 shops and 40 restaurants and eateries along the Coast Highway from D to J Streets will be open and ready for business. Live music will be playing at two venues: The Lumberyard Courtyard Stage, located at The Lumberyard, and the Community Stage, close to F Street. Both stages will feature the best in local entertainment.

The Coast Highway 101 will be closed from D Street to J Street starting at 6:00 a.m., however many parking facilities will be available for the event within a short walking distance; Moonlight Beach Parking Lot; City Hall Parking Lot on Vulcan Ave.; NCTD Coaster Station Lot at D or E Streets and Vulcan Ave. There is also free parking available at Lot B on the corner of E Street and Vulcan Ave.

Vendors who wish to participate can find an application at www.kennedyfaires.com

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Fall Festival Wheels

Test Driving “The Most Likeable Car on The Planet” 

November 2011 – It’s Sunday, the day of the Encinitas Fall Festival. The sky is grey and threatening rain, but still, the streets are full of people walking down Highway 101, leafing through the hundreds of tents that shop owners have set up to show off their goods. It smells like kettle corn, grilling sausages and coffee. But mostly it smells like the sea. It’s windy, and getting more so. I hit the street fair at E Street and 101. There are clothing racks on the corner from the thrift store and a woman selling photographs. I walk south past a band of high schoolers jamming some funk music to a crowd of a hundred. The lead singer is loud and good and moving around like Axel Rose.

At the end of the fair, where the 101 opens up to traffic, a white car is parked perpendicular to the lane. It is shaped like a toy car, only bigger, though not much bigger. There are only a couple feet, maybe less, between the end of the windshield and the front bumper. Not much room for an engine. The space between the backdoor and the back bumper is barely big enough to fit the gas cap, let alone a spacious trunk. The gas cap is also strange for another reason: this is the 2012 Mitsubishi i, an all-electric vehicle making its San Diego debut here today.  A consistent-but-manageable crowd of people sign up for a test drive. I sign up too, and wander around the booth to wait for my turn.

There is a charging station on display that looks like a gas pump, but smaller and sleeker. The charging station can be installed in the owner’s home for about $700. It charges the car in seven hours. Not great if you’re running late, but if you plug it in overnight, well the $700 might just be worth it considering it costs about $3.00 on your electrical bill for a full charge. Not bad compared to the $50-60 it costs to fill up gas powered cars these days. There are also two other charging options. One is included in the purchase price and can be plugged into almost any home outlet. Convenient? Yes. Practical? Not really. It takes over 22 hours to charge the car this way. The other is much faster. It takes 30 minutes and can be obtained through the “ultra-efficient public chargers” via the “quick charger port” (what I thought was a gas cap). Any way you slice it, it takes a long time to charge, but costs you much less.

 San Diego is often a stop for electric car test-driving tours. In 2010 the Nissan Leaf and the Chevy Volt were both available for sampling. Perhaps we’ve grown attached to our beaches and coastal estuaries and want to do what we can to keep them clean. Or maybe we just don’t want the LA smog to extend this far south. Whatever it is, earlier this year Ford listed San Diego as one of the “25 most electric vehicle-ready cities” in America.

Soon, it’s my turn for a test drive. The white car is staying put as a display and I hop in one that’s a deep plum color. A man who works for Mitsubishi slides into the passenger seat. The seats are larger than I expect and the windshield seems unnaturally far away from my face. Perhaps it’s because the car is new and empty of things and smells, but it seems cavernous inside despite its petite exterior appearance.

I turn the car on and start down J Street, towards 2nd. Suddenly a Mini Cooper backs blindly and quickly out of a driveway and into the street. Thirty seconds into the test drive and I’m already pretty confident in the brakes. We head south on Highway 101 past the Self Realization Fellowship. The ocean is white-capped and slate grey. A few groups of people battle the weather and walk along the cliff-side path. The car handles smoothly, accelerates well. It is very quiet.

There is a predetermined route for the test drive. The man in the seat next to me has been a passenger on the same route for the past two hours and has three to go. We turn left at Birmingham. “Can you pull into the 7-11 so I can get a coffee?” he says. “Sure,” I say, easing into the parking lot and turning off the car. We pause for a beat. “I can trust you not to steal the car, right?” “Yeah, I think so.” He stands up and walks inside. I get out and inspect the car. The trunk is virtually non-existent, but, like many modestly sized vehicles, it makes up for it with creative seat folding. Both back seats fold flat, and so does the front passenger seat, creating a sizable flat plane. If you wanted, you could slide in a surfboard, a bike, or a Christmas tree. The household charger is in the trunk. It looks like a gun from the Duckhunter video game.

The Mitsubishi i, is sold as a second car. It is not meant to replace your gas-powered vehicle. It gets between 62-98 miles per charge. It seems perfect for running errands around town or heading on a day trip to San Diego. It would not make it to Los Angeles and back

The man comes out of the 7-11 with his cup of coffee. I have not stolen the car, so I think he is pleased. We both get in and I put the car in reverse. A little screen comes to life on the dashboard, showing me what I’m backing towards. I pull up to the light and put the car in Eco, one of the three drive modes. Eco forces the car to drive to its most efficient potential. As the light changes from red to green and my foot presses down on the gas (do you call that pedal the gas pedal even if it’s an electric car?) I slowly accelerate. There is no kick, no dramatic acceleration, just a smooth transition from stop to go. The other two drive modes are a standard drive mode, D-position, and B-position, a mode that “increases the regenerative brake bias to maximize energy recycling.” B-position helps charge the battery while you drive, increasing the miles you can get from one charge.

Perhaps in the years to come electric vehicles will have batteries that allow you to drive across country on a single charge. Perhaps they will replace gas-powered cars entirely. For now, they are city commuters that are getting steadily more efficient, more affordable and more practical. You don’t always need a sudden burst of acceleration to get from point A to point B.

The Mitsubishi i costs $21, 625 after government rebates. It will be available at Mitsubishi dealers in San Diego, National City and El Cajon in early 2012.

 

 

 

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Annual Festival Encourages Local Shopping

November 2011 – Who said shopping for the holidays had to start after Thanksgiving and be stressful and hectic? That was certainly not the coastal vibe as thousands of people visited downtown on Nov. 20 despite the gloomy weather to enjoy the entertainment and shopping opportunities at the Annual Fall Festival.

Sponsored by DEMA, the festival boasted over 450 vendor booths hawking everything from dollar trinkets to handmade puppets and clothing to original photographs from world-famous photographers.  Highway 101 was closed between D and J Streets to allow festival-goers easy access to the vendors, shops and entertainment.

“It’s so nice to be able to just walk around and see some of the local art and what’s happening downtown,” said Patricia Neison, who brought her two dogs with her to the event.  They were among hundreds of canine companions at the event.    That was good for business at the many booths that sold custom-made doggie treats and beds.

Things began to wind down as the wind picked up and the Chargers game kicked off in the afternoon. “It’s been really steady despite the weather,” said Paul Walker, who was selling homemade candles. “I think people are really more into spending their money locally and staying away from the big-box retailers this year.”

In fact, Bliss 101 owner Helen Zeldes appealed to her loyal customer base to shop local and avoid the “Black Friday” tradition with sales and special events prior to the day after Thanksgiving. “I’m spending less money on more quality items this year,” Pearl Zuckerman said, as she browsed through the store. “I’d rather get it now and avoid the madness that happens right after Thanksgiving,” she said. “It’s gotten so bad that stores are opening at midnight just to lure people in earlier.”

While the festival was billed as a holiday shopping event, several attendees said they came more for the atmosphere than to buy gifts.  “I brought the kids because of the cool family-friendly vibe,” said Blair Thompson, an Oceanside resident.  Indeed, there were plenty of rides and games for children of all ages to enjoy.  “Our favorite is the rock-climbing wall,” Thompson said.  She estimates spending at least $50 on rides for her three children and an additional $100 on food and extras.  “We can’t pass up the kettle (pop) corn or the funnel cakes,” he said with a grin.

Several musical and performing arts acts highlighted the eclectic nature of the city.  Two stages were set for bands playing everything from traditional jazz to folk, while the Community Stage hosted dancers and music students.  “These kids are great,” said Arlene Stanford, as she watched a cheerleading troupe execute numerous sprit-filled cheers.

A new addition to the mix of vendors and entertainment included a stop on the Mitsubishi Motors North America’s tour of the 100-percent electric 2012 “Mitsubishi i.” “I absolutely love it!” said Jasmine Poulter. I really would love to have one!” she exclaimed.

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November Fall Festival

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